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THE PROVISION AND USE OF WORK EQUIPMENT REGULATIONS. ILLUSTRATE YOUR ESSAY WITH SPECIFIC EXAMPLES.

INTRODUCTION
The Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations were introduced in 1992 and placed wide-ranging responsibilities for health and safety in the workplace on employers and employees alike. The regulations are predominantly aimed at equipment used at work. These regulations were necessitated by the incessant accidents in various industries where machineries are the buck of the useful tools.
According to Pilz consultancy (2003) Health and safety at work has become a significant issue, and regulations governing the safe construction and use of machinery have been in force since the original Provision and Use of Work Equipment (PUWER) came into effect in January 1997.
There is a legal requirement for companies to comply with this legislation. Failure to comply with regulation can result in prosecutions, leading to heavy fines.

NEAR MISS ACCIDENTS
The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 requires employers to ensure, so far is as reasonably practicable, the safety and welfare of its employees whilst at work. Other legislation requires employers to report, investigate and keep a record of accidents causing injury, dangerous occurrences and occurrences of disease or ill health.

Another example of safeguarding moving machinery is the use of Guard-Operated device with tongue -operated switch. This device comprises of:

  1. A circuit-breaking element
  2. A mechanism which, when operated, causes the circuit-breaking element to be opened and closed.

A specially shaped part (tongue) is fixed on the guard so that this tongue cannot be removed. The circuit-breaking element only ensures the continuity of the circuit when the tongue is inserted into the detector. When the tongue is withdrawn, it operates in the positive mode the mechanism which opens the circuit-breaking element.

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